Democratic Repubic of Congo

HISTORY OF GLOBAL REFUGE IN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

In late 2015, war broke out in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo, displacing tens of thousands of people and causing conditions for many that were unsustainable for living. Food immediately became scarce and many were dying from malnutrition, cholera, malaria and other diseases.

Global Refuge responded in November 2015 with life-saving medical care and emergency feeding. The fighting has strengthened and weakened in the time that Global Refuge has been present in the region, but the work has never stopped. The emergency care became a full service feeding center and medical clinic with inpatient capabilities in early 2016. The clinic is able to provide lab tests and minor surgical procedures.

Global Refuge has been able to acquire land for growing essential foods in the area. These foods have been able to supplement the nutritional programs that are critical to keeping the entire displaced population from severe malnutrition.

Global Refuge continues to monitor other displacements across Eastern Congo and will respond when our assistance will be needed.

2017 KEY FIGURES


18,353

Men, women & children who received care:


16

No. staff in 2017:


$111,936 USD

2017 Expenditure


CURRENT WORK: NORTH KIVU DISTRICT

Democratic_Republic_of_the_Congo_(26_provinces)_-_Nord-Kivu.png

North Kivu District

Borders Uganda & Rwanda

STATISTICS ABOUT DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

  • Democratic Republic of Congo has one of the highest maternal death rates in the world, with 846 per 100,000 live births
  • According to the World Health Organization, the country has 0.28 physicians and 1.91 nurses/midwives per 10,000 people
  • Today, the total number of internally displaced people in DRC has reached 4.4 million, which is the highest number of any country on the African continent. North Kivu Province remains the most affected, accounting for over 1.1 million displaced persons as of April 2018.

OICHA CLINIC

MEDICINE

GRI’s Oicha Clinic provides medical treatment to the displaced Bantu and Pygmy population in the Oicha region. The clinic focuses on treatment of diarrhea, dysentery, pneumonia, upper respiratory infections, malaria, malnutrition and communicable skin infections. 

MALNUTRITION

Due to food insecurity in this region, malnutrition is a main cause of death among this population. GRI provides therapeutic and supplementary feeding to malnourished children and adults. GRI staff follows strict guidelines for enrollment in the feeding program including checking the height, weight and middle upper arm circumference of each person. This is checked again weekly to monitor weight gain. GRI also provides food and medical treatment as needed to siblings and mothers of children enrolled in the feeding program.

MEDIC TRAINING

GRI believes in training and equipping those living in displacement. Therefore community health education including hygiene, disease prevention, recognition of malnutrition, medication compliance and disease monitoring are taught to medics in this region.

AGRICULTURAL SUPPORT

In addition, GRI has been conducting an agricultural project in this region since November 2015 in order to ensure food security for those who are displaced. This program has included distribution of seeds and hoes to Pygmies and weekly visits by GRI staff to ensure proper planting and maintain accountability. Also small gardens have been planted at the Oicha clinic to provide nutrition and model healthy eating to parents and children receiving treatment at the clinic.